You know, in the United States, universities have very high fees, and not everyone can afford them. But while the majority of young people engaging the student loans, a student has decided to take an unusual route to pay tuition fees: that of porn.

EUR 60 thousand a year: so much is the straight line of the prestigious Duke University. That which Lauren this is the name by which the student has decided to tell his story is a freshman. Which defends the decision to become a porn actress to pay tuition fees, although now that his work in the world of hard (and for a particularly thorny site, it seems) was discovered the university may decide to expel.

tuition-fees

For his career ‘red light’, Lauren used a pseudonym, but perhaps because of too few details about their lives outside of Duke University told by the girl herself to some fellow student within a few months because the his double identity as a student model and porn actress came to the surface. Causing a trail of offenses and not very gallant attentions to him by the children of the Duke.

For this reason, the student decided to be interviewed by the newspaper of the University, the Duke Chronicle, and tell his unconventional choice to pay tuition fees and his experience in the world of porn. Who apparently do not mind at all: “At the end of each scene I feel stronger, I feel like a woman in control of her sexuality,” said Lauren with a good dose of feminism.

Courage and determination but may not be enough to Lauren to stay at Duke University. The university in fact must decide whether to expel the student, guilty of tarnish the reputation of the institution, or not. The choice will not be easy, because it has to do with a hot topic not only for the Duke, but for the entire university system USA: the huge cost of higher education. Figures are many zeros that force the children of the middle class and lower-middle to require substantial student loans to go to university and pay taxes. Loans that, due to the global economic crisis, not everyone can pay off, as evidenced by the continued rise of insolvency.